Of the Motion of the Sea

If as we see the sea1 doth run about
The earth, it leaves a space where’t first came out.2
For if the water were as much as land,34
The water5 would not stir, but still would6 stand.
Which shows that though the water doth go7 round, 5
Yet is there still more land than8 water9 found.
But say the air that’s moveable without,
And10 thin, doth give it11 leave to run about,
Or like a wheel which water makes to go:12
So air may cause the sea to move and13 flow.14          10
But if that air hath15 not room to move,
It cannot16 any other body shove.
Besides, what drives must needs be stronger far17
Than what it drives, or else it would not stir.18
If so, then infinites of strengths must be19                   15
In motion’s power, to move eternally.
But say all things run in a circle-line,20
And every part doth to another21 join:
They cannot in each other’s places stir,22
Unless23 some places be24 left empty bare.25               20
For stop a wheel’s circumference26 without,
Its27 center too, it cannot turn about.
If breadth and depth were full, leaving no space,
Nothing could stir nor move out of its28 place.29

  1. If as we see the sea] If that the Sea the Earth 1653
  2. The earth, it leaves a space where’t first came out.] It leaves a Space, where first the Tide went out. 1653; The Earth, it leaves a space where first came out 1668
  3. For if the water were as much as land,] The Tide, for Water, if’t as much as Land 1664; The Tide: for Water, if’t as much as Land, 1668
  4. A marginal note in Cavendish’s 1653 text reads: “In compass.” This poem has no notes in 1664 or 1668.
  5. The water] In Compass had, it 1664; but 1668
  6. still would] but, 1664, 1668
  7. doth go] still goes 1653
  8. there still more land than] the Land more then the 1653
  9. One marginal note is given in Cavendish’s 1653 text beside both lines 6 and 7: “In compass.” This presumably applies to both lines, as water was thought to encompass land, and air was thought to encompass them both. This poem has no notes in 1664 or 1668.
  10. And] Which being 1653
  11. doth give it] gives 1653
  12. like a wheel which water makes to go:] as a VVheel doth make the VVater go, 1664; as a Wheel doth make the Water go; 1668
  13. cause the sea to move and] the Water make to 1653
  14. A marginal note in Cavendish’s 1653 text reads: “As water will make a wheel to go, so air makes water go.” This poem has no notes in 1664 or 1668.
  15. But if that air hath] But, truly, if Air had 1664, 1668
  16. cannot] could not 1664, 1668
  17. must needs be stronger far] its strength must needs extend 1664, 1668
  18. Than what it drives, or else it would not stir.] Above what’s driven, or else ’twere to no end; 1664; Above what’s driven, else ’twere to no end. 1668
  19. be] lye 1664, 1668
  20. run in a circle-line,] do run in Circles line, 1653
  21. to another] altogether 1653
  22. cannot in each other’s places stir,] can out of their places where they are, 1664; can, out of their places where they are, 1668
  23. Unless] Nor stir, unless 1664, 1668
  24. be] were 1653
  25. empty bare.] bare: 1664, 1668
  26. stop a wheel’s circumference] take a Wheele, circumference stop 1653
  27. Its] And 1653
  28. could stir nor move out of its] can stir out of the selfe same 1653
  29. A marginal note in Cavendish’s 1653 text reads: “A cross motion stops the circular if there be no space between. The world turns upon two imaginary poles—the Earth upon one, the heavens upon another—yet the Earth, nor the heavens could not stir, having no vacuum. For example, a wheel could not turn round, if the circumference were pressed upon close, and the center on either side.” This poem has no notes in 1664 or 1668.