Of the Attraction of the Earth

1

The reason Earth attracts much like the sun,2
Is atoms sharp out from the Earth do come:3
From its4 circumference, like bees they rise,5
When6 from a swarm dispersed apart, each flies.7
And as they wander, meet with duller forms,8                 5
Wherein they stick their point, then back returns.9
For like10 a bee that’s loaden on11 each thigh,
Hath a great weight and12 cannot nimbly fly,
So when their points are loaded, heavy grow,13
Can14 pierce no further: backward must they go.15         10
And as their hives to Earth return again.
Thus by their travel, they the Earth maintain.

Of the Attraction of the Sun

1

When all those atoms which in rays2 do spread
Are3 ranged long, like to a slender thread,
They do not scattered fly, but join in length,
And being joined, though small, add to their strength.
The further forth they stream, more weak become,4         5
Although those beams5 are fastened to the sun.6
For all those rays which Motion down doth send7
Sharp atoms are, which from the sun descend;8
And as they flow in several streams and rays,
They stick their points in all that stop their ways,             10
Like needle points, whereon doth something stick,
No passage9 make, having no force10 to prick.11
Thus12 being stopped, they straightways13 back do run,
Drawing those bodies with them to the sun.

Of the Attraction of the Poles, and of Frost

1

The North and South do with the sun agree,
For in them all contracting motions be.
The sun as he with scorching heat doth burn,
So cold is sharp, where North and South Pole turn:2
For atoms there are like to pincers small,                            5
By which they do attract, and pull3 withall.4
When motion from the poles shoots them about,
Mixing with porous bodies when they’re out.
And with those pincers small those bodies nip,5
So close and hard, they cannot from them get,6                  10
Unless some sharp and fiery atoms get7
Betwixt those pincers small, and so do set8
Those bodies free, just9 like an awl that bores,
Or like a picklock, which doth open doors.
For when they’re opened by those fiery awls,                      15
Let go their holds,10 which men11 a thaw straight calls.
If not, they pinch those bodies close together,
And then we12 say it is hard13 frosty weather.